Here is our process . . .
First things first!  Safety of you, your property, our personnel and the environment is imperative.  Our fuel polishing staff will conduct a survey of safety concerns and address each prior to beginning work.  Usually this involves minor adjustments to the work environment, but our personnel are held accountable for determining work site safety and are authorized to discontinue services until concerns are remedied.  Our goal is to perform our services with zero incidents: to property, any person or to the environment.  We take safety very seriously, yours and ours.
Next . . .  Our personnel will briefly discuss the nature of the problem with our customer or representative.  Any information regarding access to the fuel tank, construction or design of the tank(s) to be cleaned or other considerations will be helpful and reduce the time necessary to perform our services.  Our equipment will be placed and secured, safety materials placed appropriately and cleaning connections made.  Prior to filtering operations, we'll check for and remove any water in the tank.

Let the polishing begin . . .  After securing the cleaning hoses, the filtering process begins.  Two hoses are used in this process; the pickup line and the return line.  Our return lines are of smaller diameter than our pickup lines, so the fliud returning to the tank goes back in under mild pressure.  This pressure is used to "stir into suspension" contaminants in the tank which typically reside at the bottom of the tank.  The "contaminated" fuel is then sucked back up by the pickup line.  While the filtering process is taking place, our personnel will continually monitor pressure gauges for the machine which indicate when it is time to change filters.  When a filter change is necessary, the machine will be turned off and the filter change will take place.  Typically, a filter change takes between 3 and 5 minutes, with extra care taken to make sure no fuel or contaminant is spilled or lost.  Once the filter change is complete, the machine is restarted and the process repeats.  During the filtering process, our personnel will "stir" the bottom and corners of the tank to make sure that "contaminant pockets" are scoured to ensure the best possible fuel polishing job.  When the pickup pressure gauge remains low and fixed for a period of 20 minutes, the fuel polishing process is suspended.

We now have machines to clean tanks from 25 gallons to 20,000 gallons!

Above is a picture of one of our cleaning units working at one of Maine's Border stations!



Cleanup, Pack up & Results Review 
After your fuel and internal tank have been cleaned, we'll begin the cleanup process.  We'll remove the fuel pickup and return lines from your tank, paying special attention to the cleanliness of your equipment or vessel.  Our goal is to "leave no drop behind".  We'll close up any access we have made to your tank and make sure all is left as we found it; with the exception of the condition of your fuel, of course!  We'll pack up our equipment, cleaning the fuel and collecting contaminants from it as we go.  Cleanup typically takes about 1/2 hour.  If our customer is on-site and available, results from the polishing service call will be discussed prior to departure.  Results from our service can be communicated via email or fax as well.

Hazardous Waste & Waste Fuel 
We are licensed to transport and correctly deal with hazardous waste and waste fuel. This allows us to offer a full start to finish service to our customers and correctly recycle, or dispose of any material produced from the cleaning process.

Inspection . . .  Prior to pack up up our equipment, we will make a visual inspection of the inside of the tank cleaned via light and mirror.  We'll be checking for fuel clarity, pockets of contamination and re-check for water in the fuel.  If any contamination is found, we'll restart the filtering process with special attention given to contamination pockets located during the inspection process.

Tank Pressure Testing
We also have pressure testing equipment for smaller marine tanks. This process involves blocking all airways into a tank and hooking it up to a gauge while adding 3 lbs of pressure to the tank. We can determine if your tank has a hole or crack in the tank this way.
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